UPDATED: Union expects deal to return school salad bars

06/25/2013 10:20:00 AM
Mike Hornick

Courtesy Dole Food Co.Dole representatives and nutrition advocates attend a September opening for a donated salad bar at Foothill Elementary School in Monterey, Calif. From left to right: Marty Ordman, vice president of marketing Communications, Dole Food Co; Kent Hansen, senior vice president, Dole Fresh Vegetables; Ray De Riggi, President, Dole Fresh Vegetables; Niaomi Hrepich, regional director, Network for a Healthy California Central Coast Region; and Karen Bertram, nutrition consultant for Team California for Healthy Kids at the California Department of Education.(UPDATED COVERAGE June 26) The union whose grievance prompted the removal of salad bars from six schools in Monterey, Calif., expects to reach an agreement soon with district officials on their return.

“We meet July 10 and we should have something settled by then,” said Robert Cummings, Chapter 93 president for the Classified School Employees Association.

At issue was the number of extra hours needed to prepare, stock, supervise and clean a lunchroom with a salad bar. Monterey Peninsula Unified School District funded 2.5 extra hours, Cummings said, but at larger schools in the group, staffers said it wasn’t adequate.

“We kept telling the district that our people are working through their breaks and lunches to get all this stuff ready to go for the kids,” Cummings said. “We supported the salad bars 100%, but we can’t have our workers breaking our contract or state law. The district didn’t follow through, so we had to tell them to stop it until we could come up with a settlement.”

The salad bars were removed in early May, about a month before the school year ended. Dole Food Co. donated five salad bars to the district in September.

The extra hours sufficed for lunchrooms serving about 125 students, Cummings said, but were problematic beyond that.

“At a smaller school that was enough, because you’re dealing with fewer kids and the lunch period is shorter,” he said. “But at a larger school your lunch period takes longer because you’ve got so many kids. You’re going through the salad bar faster; you’re trying to restock it. There just wasn’t enough time.”

The agreement will probably include an extra lunchroom employee for up to 4 hours a day to work on the salad bar, he said.

The union unfairly received bad publicity for the removal of the salad bars, Cummings said.

“Everybody’s making it look like we’re trying to stop this, but if the district had done it the right way the first time, we wouldn’t be at this point,” he said.

Dan Albert, the district’s associate superintendent of business services, didn’t welcome the publicity either. He, too, expects an agreement soon.

“This has been blown way out of proportion,” he said. “We just moved the salad bar from the Dole serviced containers in our cafeteria to our serving line. Kids got the same products.”

“It took an additional worker to man the salad bars in the cafeteria,” Albert said. “We decided it was better to pull them out two weeks before the end of the year and talk to the union. Everybody thought we were canceling, but it was just temporary.”


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Charlie    
California  |  June, 27, 2013 at 08:36 AM

This really puts the spotlight on the union which has used the children as human shields. Robert Cummings is very kind to himself and the union when he says that they support the salad bars 100%. His words certainly don't match their actions. They deserve the PR nightmare that they have created for themselves. More than that, they should be ashamed of themselves.

Robert    
Idaho  |  July, 01, 2013 at 03:24 PM

Charlie nailed it dead on! How long will it take for the American people to wake up and gain some sense? Isn't it about time that we do the right thing?!!

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