Those campaigning for the continuation of a 16-year-old tomato trade agreement with Mexico are publishing this advertisement asking the Obama Administration to retain the agreement.
Those campaigning for the continuation of a 16-year-old tomato trade agreement with Mexico are publishing this advertisement asking the Obama Administration to retain the agreement.

Business representatives from the U.S. are continuing a campaign to save a 16-year-old tomato trade agreement with Mexico in the form of a consumer website and an Oct. 2 media teleconference.

The website, www.savemytomato.com, includes a six-page list of supporters ranging from produce companies to members of Congress. It also includes frequently asked questions about the tomato trade agreement between the U.S. and Mexico.

The Oct. 2 press conference is scheduled to include leaders from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Foreign Trade Council. Also on the agenda are John McClung, president of the Texas International Produce Association, Mission, Texas, and Lance Jungmeyer, president of the Fresh Produce Association of the Americas, Nogales, Ariz.

Among the concerns of the business leaders is the potential loss of billions of dollars in trade, as well as American jobs, according to a news release.

Terminating the agreement would be disastrous, Jungmeyer said in the release, leading to job losses in many U.S. industries, increased prices to U.S. consumers and a trade war with Mexico that could have a devastating impact on U.S. export industries.

Leaders from the U.S. Chamber said in the release that ending the tomato agreement would threaten the trading relationship with the country’s second-largest export market, which could spur the new Mexican administration to impose retaliatory measures against U.S. businesses.

Florida tomato growers asked the U.S. Department of Commerce to end the tomato agreement that has governed the price of imported Mexican tomatoes since 1996.