Food safety leaders promote industry collaboration - The Packer

Food safety leaders promote industry collaboration

05/03/2013 10:35:00 AM
Coral Beach

click image to zoomGary Ades, chairman of the Food Safety Summit educational advisory committee, moderates a town hall session with Joseph Corby (from left), the USDACoral BeachCutline: Gary Ades, chairman of the Food Safety Summit educational advisory committee (at lectern), moderates a town hall session with Joseph Corby (from left), executive director of the Association of Food and Drug Officials, Elisabeth Hagen, undersecretary for food safety at the USDA, and Mike Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods at FDA.BALTIMORE — Integration was a recurring theme at the 12th annual Food Safety Summit where produce professionals, government officials and non-governmental organization leaders repeatedly said collaboration at all levels will be the key to success.

Will Daniels, senior vice president for operations at Earthbound Farm, San Juan Bautista, Calif., called for cooperation and transparency. He said Earthbound corporate leaders feel so strongly about encouraging collaboration that they will soon open their facilities to competitors to share food safety techniques.

Daniels also called for produce companies to “stop thinking government is out to get us and start working with them.”

“I believe most in government are public servants who want to help,” Daniels said. “I believe government has recognized the need for change.”

Several government officials and leaders of non-governmental organizations discussed that need for change during summit sessions.

“The most important need and challenge is to truly integrate food safety systems in the United States,” said Joseph Corby, executive director of the Association of Food and Drug Officials, York, Pa.

“It is the only way to truly make a difference. We need to knock down barriers and change the culture that has kept us from integrating the food safety system.”

Corby was one of three panelists at a question-and-answer session May 2.

Elisabeth Hagen, undersecretary for food safety at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said the department needs input from industry and academia as its staff works on “modernizing the agency.” She said USDA’s work in food safety hasn’t kept pace with the technology and information available and insight from external sources is crucial for the agency to catch up.

Mike Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods at the Food and Drug Administration, said in addition to industry sources the FDA relies on state agencies to help with food safety. He said FDA already has contracts with state agencies to conduct 60% of its inspections, a practice that will continue under the Food Safety Modernization Act.

“We believe we need to build even more partnerships with states,” Taylor said. “States are a huge asset and can work in supportive and cost-effective ways.”

Other FDA administrators discussed integration efforts that have been in the works since the 1990s during a session titled “Understanding the Regulatory Community and the Partnership for Food Protection.”


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