Statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show that Mexico by far is the most important supplier of fresh produce to the U.S., accounting for 69% of U.S. fresh vegetable import value and 37% of U.S. fresh fruit import value in 2012.

U.S. imports of Mexican fresh fruit totaled $2.86 billion in 2012, with the import value increasing by an average of about 20% per year from 1999 to 2012. By comparison, the value of U.S. imports of Chilean fruit totaled $1.22 billion in 2012, up an average of 10% per year over the same period.

Mexico accounted for $4.05 billion in U.S. fresh vegetable imports in 2012. From 1999 to 2012, the average annual growth in the value of U.S. fresh vegetable imports from Mexico was 15%, compared with 14% annual growth in in the value of U.S. fresh imports from Canada. While Peru accounted for just 5% of U.S. fresh vegetable import value in 2012, annual growth in the value of imports of fresh vegetables from Peru averaged 31% from 1999 to 2012, according to the report.

Total U.S. vegetable import volume has increased at an average rate of 5.1% in the last twelve years, almost double the 2.7% average annual growth in the volume of U.S. fruit imports, according to the report.

The report said that average annual price inflation for U.S. vegetable imports from 1999 to 2011 was 3.3%, while the average price inflation for fruit imports was 5%.