Mango board promotes nutrition studies

12/05/2013 04:01:00 PM
Doug Ohlemeier

New research on mangos shows the fruit possesses more than only benefits from vitamins and minerals.

Because mangos possess more than 20 vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A and vitamin C, recent studies suggest consumption of the “superfruit” is associated with healthier diets, according to a news release from the Orlando, Fla.-based National Mango Board.

National Mango BoardThe research publicized by the board shows how mango consumption is linked to lower blood sugar levels and may possess cancer-fighting properties.

In a study published in The Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences, researchers examined the diets of more than 29,000 children and adults from 2001-08.

The research concludes adults who consume mangos tend to possess a higher intake of certain nutrients including potassium and dietary fiber, which help contribute to a balanced diet, according to the release.

The researchers also found lower levels of C-reactive proteins in adult mango consumers. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and high levels of it in the blood are believed to be linked to increased risk for heart disease.

Compared to non-mango consumers, adults who eat mangos on average possess higher intakes of whole fruit, vitamins C, potassium and dietary fiber while possessing lower intakes of added-sugars, saturated fats and sodium, according to the release.

While more research is needed on how mango consumption affects human health, initial research suggests mango consumption may help lower blood sugar levels in obese adults.

In a pilot study at Oklahoma State University, researchers found men and women participants saw significantly lower blood sugar levels compared to their baselines, according to the release.

Additionally, research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry examining the antioxidant polyphenols or natural compounds present in mangos, particularly those from the ataulfo and haden varieties, inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells, according to the release.



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