Oceanside Pole tomato volumes expected to be up - The Packer

Oceanside Pole tomato volumes expected to be up

07/09/2013 02:31:00 PM
Andy Nelson

oceanside pole tomatoesCourtesy The Oppenheimer GroupThe tomato harvest has begun for Oceanside, Calif.-based West Coast Tomato Growers, owners of the Oceanside Pole brand, and volumes are expected to be up this year.

Harvest began at the end of June and should continue through the fall, according to a news release from Vancouver, British Columbia-based The Oppenheimer Group, marketer of Oceanside Pole tomatoes.

Volumes should be up due to increased acreage and a return to the original Oceanside seed variety, according to the release.

“Growing conditions have been ideal throughout the last few months,” Aaron Quon, Oppy’s greenhouse and vegetable categories director, said in the release. “We made a few adjustments in the off season which we believe will enhance our customers’ experience even further. We’re really quite proud to bring these tomatoes to market knowing the effort and expertise that has gone into their production―and having tasted the result.”

West Coast is growing vine-ripes and romas this year.



Comments (2) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left

Juanita Lusher    
Mountain Ranch, Ca  |  July, 16, 2013 at 08:55 PM

Tomatoes are great looking but no flavor. What kind are they? They just say vine ripe and Oceanside Pole. They have no seeds and are very meaty but they have no flavor. I was very disappointed.

Taylor Brosious    
Austin, TX  |  November, 17, 2013 at 12:56 PM

I've also found that these tomatoes lack flavor. Something else I've observed about them on two separate occasions is the presence of condition known as "vivipary", in which there is a hormonal imbalance in the tomato that causes the seeds to sprout inside before the fruit becomes rotten or fermented. The tomatoes I found sprouts in were cut open within days of purchase and still appeared firm & fresh. Some sources suggest that this phenomena may be a result of extreme weather conditions while ripening or over-maturation during transit, and it's likely to influence the flavor in some way... sort of unfortunate but very interesting!

Feedback Form
Leads to Insight