Focus on food safety could cause delays, expenses

06/20/2012 03:34:00 PM
Melissa Shipman

“It’s the growers that will suffer, I think,” he said.

The ports in New York and New Jersey currently have many facilities on the Hudson River, causing U.S. Department of Agriculture officials and staff to travel from place to place for various shipments at different locations.

“The staff was running around from terminal to terminal and costing a lot of money,” Greenberg said.

This new system puts all the fruit in one place, which Greenberg said has pros and cons.

“It’s good because it will centralize everything and allow things to work more efficiently,” he said.

However, the produce will have to be moved to those designated locations and wait there for inspection, which could cause delays.

“It has the potential to add cost to growers, which can be hard for them to sustain,” Greenberg said.

Estuardo Masias, co-owner and chief executive officer of La Calera, Chincha, Peru, said the new system creates a big bottleneck problem for all the company’s cargo.

“We just scrapped New York ports out of our destinations for now, and have asked the Peruvian government to intervene,” Masias said.

The changes are set to take place this year, Greenberg said, and he said his company is interested to see how it will work out.

“It’s an awful lot of citrus that goes through there. It could be quite a mess. It’s something our operations staff isn’t happy about, but we’ll manage and comply with the law,” he said.


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