Consumer skepticism drives 'green revolution'

07/06/2012 01:31:00 PM
Cynthia David

Things such as sensors to monitor every scrap of moisture in the ground and every drop of water used in the fields, or incentives that encourage drivers to burn less fuel.

“It comes down to tracking,” said Meek. “That which gets measured and tracked can be improved.”

Nikki Rodoni, director of sustainability for Gills Onions, said being able to validate sustainability claims also becomes a powerful marketing tool.

Gills has been invited to share the success of its sustainability initiatives at conferences, Rodoni said, and the company is invited to the table to discuss regulatory issues.

“We’re being seen as leaders, getting out there and sharing our stories about the new technologies and new practices we’re using,” Rodoni said.

Now it’s time for the entire industry to get over its natural shyness and get out and tell consumers about all the great work they’re doing, she said.

The news is positive, said Reiter, and green is definitely here to stay.

“There’s a lot we all can do to make agriculture more effective and safer at the same time,” she said, “Safer for the environment, safer for people who work in agriculture and safer for consumers.”


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