Strawberry pallet-sealing technology advances

03/28/2012 01:46:00 PM
Mike Hornick

SALINAS, Calif. — This is the first spring season clients of TransFresh Corp.’s strawberry pallet-sealing technology, Tectrol Atmospheres, can access an online database detailing the company’s work.

Shipper clients like Driscoll’s and Naturipe can log into the system anytime at www.transfresh.com.

The information was compiled over time by entering data at each service call.

“We’ve been working on that for two years, and we have enough now,” said Rich Macleod, vice president of the pallet division for TransFresh North America.

“The advantage to TransFresh is that it measures how successful we are in keeping a CO2 atmosphere inside a pallet bag, and a 30-minute response time to the cooler.”

Information is also available to buyers.

“TransFresh is the only company that will inspect strawberries as an independent at the retail site,” Macleod said.

“If we do a quality assurance inspection at Safeway or Kroger, they’ll have that data available to them.

“A modified atmosphere reduces mold and decay and has a value to retailers and to consumers at the kitchen sink.

“We’re inspecting the integrity of our seal. It’s a technical process and you need to make sure it’s done right at the shipping point and do the endpoint inspections as well.”

Some clients like knowing the details of what’s done by the company’s Tectrol Service Network, and that the monitoring is regular.

“The traceability issue alerted us to the fact that we should be developing information more transparently to our shippers,” Macleod said.

“They didn’t demand it, but they like it now that they’re seeing it.”

TransFresh is owned by Chiquita Brands International.

The company touts the cost effectiveness of its product with a profit calculator at www.tectrol-calculator.com.

Later this year, the company plans to step up its presence in the blueberry trade.

“We think we have products coming down the line in blueberry storage that will improve what’s being done there,” Macleod said.

“Blueberries are different. The people working with those want to hold fruit for maybe four or six weeks. Theirs is more of a storage application.”



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