Florida growers expect late avocado crop

05/28/2010 09:15:32 AM
Doug Ohlemeier

Grower-shippers of Florida avocados say retailers should expect volume to start later than normal during the beginning of this season’s harvesting.

Though Florida growers typically start harvesting their large green-skinned avocados in late May, commercial volumes normally ramp up by mid-June, with promotable volumes usually hitting in early July.

Some say the deal’s volume should be up to one to two weeks later than last year’s start.

Peter Schnebly, co-owner and chief executive officer of Fresh King Inc., Homestead, Fla., said he expects a slow start.



Doug Ohlemeier

Grower-shippers of Florida avocados say retailers should expect volume to start later than normal during the beginning of this season’s harvesting.

“This is not a typical year,” he said in early May. “With the two freezes we had this winter, we could be two to three weeks late. We will be fine with the fruit we have but it should be slow with the start of the harvest.”

Schnebly said the harvest’s start depends on the region’s rainy season, which normally begins in late May.

The so-called “June drop,” which typically occurs in late May, when trees drop excess fruit, should provide growers a better idea of what this season will bring, said Peter Leifermann, sales and category manager of Miami-based J&C Tropicals Inc.

“We have had a wet winter relatively speaking, but it’s warming up fast,” he said in early May. “We had record-breaking heat (in early May). We won’t be on schedule but a week late during the first month. From the end of May to the end of June, we should catch up during that first full week of July, when volume always hits.”

While past years have always brought some volume before July, Leifermann said volume should be much less this year.

Before a windstorm struck growing regions in late April, Bill Brindle, vice president of sales management for Brooks Tropicals Inc., Homestead, said the industry was hoping for a harvest around 1.1 million bushels, one of the largest crops since 2005.

The storm, which brought winds exceeding 50 mph that blew an undetermined amount of small fruit off trees, could have affected up to a third of growers’ early season shipments



Prev 1 2 Next All


Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left

Feedback Form