Session focuses on marketing health benefits

07/21/2011 11:18:00 AM
Dan Gailbraith

The council tries to “keep it personal” by promoting blueberries as a fruit that fits consumers’ lifestyles and is appropriate for any kind of meal, she said.

The Corvallis-based Oregon Raspberry & Blackberry Commission promotes its products by developing a connection between consumers and growers, said Cat McKenzie, marketing director and symposium administrator and conference coordinator.

The commission keeps up on the latest research and holds an annual Oregon Berry Camp — an extensive close-up look at the berry industry for the media.

The Cranberry Institute, Carver, Mass., also tries to “influence the influencers,” said Martin Starr, science adviser. The institute focuses on cranberries’ positive effect on urinary tract infections.

The processing segment also was represented at the session.

“We are inside other products,” said Susan Davis, registered dietitian, nutrition adviser and spokeswoman for the Wild Blueberry Association of North America, Old Town, Maine.

She traced how blueberries “went from a ho-hum fruit to something exciting” following the revelation in the mid-1990s that the berries outperformed other fruits and vegetables in the ORAC — Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity — measurement.

Tom Krugman, promotions director for the Washington Red Raspberry Commission, Lynden, which represents processors, listed five reasons to eat raspberries, including that they were listed among the top 15 best antioxidant sources by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.


Prev 1 2 Next All


Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left

Feedback Form
Leads to Insight