As a youngster, Henry Dill held a typical attitude toward Brussels sprouts.

“I used to hate Brussels sprouts,” said Dill, sales manager for Salinas, Calif.-based Pacific International Marketing.

“My idea of eating Brussels sprouts was throwing them at my brother.”

Now, Dill said, “They’re wonderful. I cook a lot, and there’s a lot of different ways to prepare them in such a way that they don’t smell up the kitchen like the old, traditional ways.”      

He added the “superfood” label that Brussels sprouts carry has helped change their image with consumers.

“But the cooking shows, cooking magazines, newspapers and the companies that have been selling Brussels sprouts have been doing so much more to make Brussels sprouts a lot less of a mystery to prepare,” Dill said.

“From a health standpoint, a nutrition standpoint and a creativity standpoint, they’re still extremely popular, and there’s an increase in consumption,” said Butch Corda, general manager for Salinas, Calif.-based Ippolito International LP. 

Bob Montgomery, sales manager for Guadalupe, Calif.-based Beachside Produce LLC, said Brussels sprouts have become more of a staple item that stores don’t want to be without.

“It’s benefiting from more and more people using Brussels sprouts, whether it be chopped up, shaved up, bagged, mixed in with salads,” he said. “All of these uses for Brussels sprouts have increased the movement.”Lori Bigras, director of marketing and communications for Salinas, Calif.-based Growers Express, which markets under the Green Giant Fresh brand, said in an e-mail that total U.S. sales growth for Brussels sprouts was 19.9% for the past 52 weeks through Jan. 22, according to IRI data.

She added that Brussels sprouts exceeded average dollar growth for all produce (by 4.5%) and for vegetables (by 5.4%).

“I used to hate Brussels sprouts,” said Dill, sales manager for Salinas, Calif.-based Pacific International Marketing.

“My idea of eating Brussels sprouts was throwing them at my brother.”

Now, Dill said, “They’re wonderful. I cook a lot, and there’s a lot of different ways to prepare them in such a way that they don’t smell up the kitchen like the old, traditional ways.”      

He added the “superfood” label that Brussels sprouts carry has helped change their image with consumers.

“But the cooking shows, cooking magazines, newspapers and the companies that have been selling Brussels sprouts have been doing so much more to make Brussels sprouts a lot less of a mystery to prepare,” Dill said.

“From a health standpoint, a nutrition standpoint and a creativity standpoint, they’re still extremely popular, and there’s an increase in consumption,” said Butch Corda, general manager for Salinas, Calif.-based Ippolito International LP. 

Bob Montgomery, sales manager for Guadalupe, Calif.-based Beachside Produce LLC, said Brussels sprouts have become more of a staple item that stores don’t want to be without.

“It’s benefiting from more and more people using Brussels sprouts, whether it be chopped up, shaved up, bagged, mixed in with salads,” he said. “All of these uses for Brussels sprouts have increased the movement.”

Lori Bigras, director of marketing and communications for Salinas, Calif.-based Growers Express, which markets under the Green Giant Fresh brand, said in an e-mail that total U.S. sales growth for Brussels sprouts was 19.9% for the past 52 weeks through Jan. 22, according to IRI data.

She added that Brussels sprouts exceeded average dollar growth for all produce (by 4.5%) and for vegetables (by 5.4%).