According to the Organic Trade Association, millennials not only are devouring organic fruits and vegetables themselves, but as parents, the 18- to 34-year-olds are buying organic for their whole family. Millennials, who account for more than half of U.S. parents, have become the largest group of organic buyers in the U.S., according to an OTA survey.
According to the Organic Trade Association, millennials not only are devouring organic fruits and vegetables themselves, but as parents, the 18- to 34-year-olds are buying organic for their whole family. Millennials, who account for more than half of U.S. parents, have become the largest group of organic buyers in the U.S., according to an OTA survey.

Millennials and organics seem to be a perfect match, according to a survey released in the fall by the Washington, D.C.-based Organic Trade Association.

According to OTA, millennials not only are devouring organic fruits and vegetables themselves, but as parents, the 18- to 34-year-olds are buying organic for their whole family.

In fact, millennials, who account for more than half of U.S. parents, have become the largest group of organic buyers in the U.S., the survey said.

“The millennial consumer and head of household is changing the landscape of our food industry,” Laura Batcha, OTA CEO and executive director, said in a news release.

“Our survey shows that millennial parents seek out organic because they are more aware of the benefits of organic, that they place a greater value on knowing how their food was grown and produced, and that they are deeply committed to supporting a food system that sustains and nurtures the environment,” she said.

The survey also indicated that Generation X parents made up 35% of parents who choose organics, and baby boomers account for 14%.

While OTA and Kiwi Magazine have conducted surveys of the organic buying patterns of households since 2009, this was the first time buying habits have been broken down by generation.

Nearly half of all households surveyed spanning all generations said they are buying more organic foods today than a year ago.

While all generations of parents seem to be gaining knowledge about organics, millennials consider themselves especially in tune with organic products, with 77% saying they are “well-informed” or “know quite a bit” about the category, the survey said.

And more than half — 54% — of millennials said they have confidence in the integrity of the organic label, with almost 60% of millennial parents saying they have a “strong connection” with the label and feel the organic label is an important part of how they shop for food.

“The millennial shopper puts a high premium on the healthiness and quality of the food they choose for their families,” Batcha said in the release.

“This generation has grown up eating organic and seeing that organic label. It’s not surprising that they have a greater knowledge of what it means to be organic, and consequently a greater trust of the organic label.”