In Mississippi, beekeepers can post a 'bee alert' flag that lets pesticide applicators know hives are present.
In Mississippi, beekeepers can post a 'bee alert' flag that lets pesticide applicators know hives are present.

Growers, beekeepers and pesticide applicators are working together to protect honeybees under the Louisiana Pollinator Cooperative Conservation Program.

"Essentially, what we’re doing is representing both beekeepers and farmers at the same table,” Louisiana State University AgCenter entomologist Sebe Brown said in a news release. “Since they often have their operations in the same vicinity, we felt a need to have both groups sit down together.”

Honeybee populations already are reeling from a combination of stressors, including poor diets, viral diseases, the parasitic varroa mite, transportation and pesticide exposure.

The group wants to adopt a bee hive location program similar to that of Mississippi.

In that state, beekeepers use a "bee alert" yellow and black flag to indicate hive locations.

The highly visible flag is recognizable by farmers and pesticide applicators.

The identification program is on top of new Environmental Protection Agency insecticide label guidelines.