Hate the campaign? At least it’s not Russia

03/30/2012 08:56:00 AM
Chris Koger

But as someone who rubs elbows with Beltway insiders, Keeling cut right to the subject that he’s probably asked about on a daily basis: the presidential race.

He didn’t have good news — or at least didn’t have news the members of the potato industry in attendance wanted to hear — saying that if things keep on track, President Obama will get four more years.

“I really know how badly the Republicans and most of the people in this room want to replace the president with somebody else, but you have to have somebody to beat somebody, and the Republicans are not exactly trotting out the most exciting group of candidates,” Keeling said.

Based on a show of hands, Mitt Romney doesn’t have a lot of fans in the potato industry. And Romney will be the nominee, he said.

Relying on enthusiasm not for the Republican nominee, but on replacing Obama with anyone, is not a winning strategy.

“How motivated is the Republican base going to be when they don’t have the candidate they prefer?” Keeling asked.

On top of that, Keeling has a theory that candidates have one chance at the brass ring, and Romney’s ended during the last presidential primary.

Regardless of who the eventual nominee is, Keeling said the campaign has diminished the candidate’s capabilities.

It could be worse, he said. This could be Russia, where Vladimir Putin returned to the presidency amid allegations of fraudulent voting. Putin campaigned with an anti-U.S. message.

“Then you’d better bring Vladimir Putin over here,” Keeling said after his question of how many people in the room wanted to replace Obama was met with cheers and whistles.

Despite the Republican infighting and its effect on voter sentiment, the system works.

“It’s not been pretty to watch,” Keeling said. “But we have a lot to be thankful for in this country, and I’m proud of it in terms of our government.”

———

Back to Russia. My sister used to live south of Homer, Alaska, on the Kenai Peninsula. While you couldn’t see Russia from the cabin she built with her husband (unlike at Sarah Palin’s house), her three-sided outhouse had a spectacular view of Kachemak Bay.

Down a series of switchbacks just off the bay is a fiercely independent Russian community.

Strangers are given the cold shoulder, I’ve been told. I never went there, but it’s no secret that Alaskans still have the frontier mentality.


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