Recalls bring silver lining of stronger focus

08/31/2012 09:27:00 AM
Tom Stenzel

Tom Stenzel, United Fresh Produce AssociationTom Stenzel, United Fresh Produce AssociationAs I’ve worked with many of our members dealing with food safety issues this summer, I’m reminded of a critical fact that needs our attention as an industry — food safety is everyone’s responsibility.

While food safety begins with an individual company, our industry is only as strong as our weakest link.

From grower through retailer and foodservice buyer, we must all work together to ensure that our supply chain delivers the safest possible product to every consumer, every time.

Now, we all know there is no such thing as zero risk.

While we grow and distribute the healthiest products known to man, fruits and vegetables are grown in natural environments, and contamination can occur anywhere along the supply chain that produce is exposed without a “kill step” that can catch the one-in-a-million exception that all our safeguards cannot prevent.

But that’s no excuse for not doing everything we each can to adopt best practices at every level of our industry.

Growers across every commodity group need to understand the risks associated with their operations, and specific practices in production and packing.

Food safety challenges are not limited to certain commodities, and they are not limited by region.

Whether you’ve had an outbreak associated with your product or not, no one can dismiss the need to ensure that risks are identified and consistently managed in your own operation.

Fresh-cut processors first need to procure quality raw products, as they are buyers before they are processors.

These prepared food manufacturers then must ensure a sanitary environment in their plants, and prevent cross-contamination in the rare event something bad slips through.

Wholesalers and distributors need to understand their food safety responsibilities and take new responsibility in the supply chain.

They too are buyers who need to know their vendors before accepting product.

They too must hold produce in sanitary environments and maintain the cold chain.

Perhaps most importantly as key players in the middle of our supply chains, they must be able to track where product comes from and where it goes.

That’s not the Produce Traceability Initiative. That’s simply the very basic requirement of the law to track every product one step up and one step back.

Retail and foodservice buyers bear the ultimate responsibility for ensuring that their supply chains are aligned around food safety.

Companies on the buy side of produce must have a commitment to food safety that permeates their organizations, ensuring that buyers on the desk share the same commitment as corporate VPs.


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BJ Reid    
Central CA  |  September, 20, 2012 at 01:31 AM

This is a well-written piece and it softened the blow of reading about yet another spinach recall. I am a member of a group of people afflicted with PIDD--primary immune deficiency disease. I am immunocompromised and food safety is of great importance to me and people like me. Nutrition is also critical. I happen to eat spinach several times a week. Please keep our food safe, and lobby for people who will do the same.

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