Drop the drugs, and keep the grapefruit

11/29/2012 04:53:00 PM
Tom Karst

The big drop has occurred in the past 15 years, with 2010 per-capita consumption at 6 pounds total, with 2.8 pounds fresh and a mere 3.2 pounds of farm weight grapefruit.

Though fighting an epic uphill battle, the Florida Department of Citrus is trying to get the good news about grapefruit out there.

Earlier this year, department-funded research found that women age 19 and older who consume grapefruit tend to have significantly greater intakes of several key nutrients, including vitamin C, potassium, dietary fiber, beta-carotene, magnesium and vitamin B6 than those who don’t consume grapefruit.

What’s next for grapefruit? The grim per-capita consumption numbers are not encouraging, no doubt. And the periodic alarming news stories about grapefruit interaction with drugs aren’t likely to disappear, even as the number of pill-popping Americans increases.

We need the top minds of the fresh produce industry to reverse this slide in grapefruit consumption. Still, it may be an impossible task.

Think about it: When was the last time you had a grapefruit or grapefruit juice? For me, it has been quite a while, and I don’t even take any pills (yet).

It’s time for me to put grapefruit back on the shopping list.

The first person I’m putting on the task force for reviving grapefruit demand is the reader who suggested to “drop the drugs, keep the grapefruit.” Depending on what medicines you are taking, that may be sound advice.

Better yet, all of us who are not yet on prescription medications that clash with grapefruit should let one of Mother Nature’s finest fruits work its magic now.

Perhaps in that process we can avoid the dozens of medications that will arbitrarily take grapefruit and grapefruit juice off our shopping list.

————

Moms are viewed as heroic when they serve vegetables to their family.

Not like Captain America spandex and cape status, perhaps, but a hero nonetheless.

A new Cornell University study published in Public Health Nutrition surveyed 500 U.S. mothers. The participants rated the personality of women who either prepared or did not prepare vegetables with a family meal and rated four different meals that either included or did not include a vegetable, according to a press release about the study.



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Barb    
Florida  |  November, 30, 2012 at 09:34 AM

Let's start by having tee shirts made with that comment on them! And in answer to your question, I make fresh grapefruit juice every weekend. Of course, some people can't "drop" their medications, but it's still a good rallying cry.

Tom K    
Lenexa  |  November, 30, 2012 at 11:32 AM

Sounds like a great idea Barb! I think they would move!

brian    
Florida  |  December, 01, 2012 at 10:29 AM

I also support, "drop medications and eat healthier". It would improve a persons outlook on life, their attitude, and their health. North americans are lazy and want an easy fix. This is just another excuse, sick of hearing it.

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