Weekend roundup - Certainty and outbreak investigation?

06/22/2009 06:56:57 AM
Tom Karst

Listening to DC Talk this morning as I consider the top fruit and vegetable/food safety stories in the consumer media over the past few days. Here are the nominees;

Recall leaves mystery in its wake

From the Washington Post:

Federal microbiologists and food safety investigators have descended on the Danville, Va., plant that makes Nestlé's refrigerated cookie dough, trying to crack a scientific mystery surrounding a national outbreak of illness from E. coli 0157, a deadly strain of bacteria, which has been linked to the product.

TK: Shades of tomatoes? An Oregon health official says he is 100% certain it is Nestle cookie dough, though no tests have confirmed E. coli in the product. Some 39% of consumers disregard the “don’t eat raw” label, the article says.

French apple growers decry imports

From the Freshinfo story:

French apple growers are up in arms at the volume and price points of imported apples being marketed in France.
Bruno Dupont, president of the French growers’ union Fédération Nationale des Producteurs de Fruits, has written to the owner of the Leclerc supermarket chain Michel-Edouard Leclerc to express his “stupefaction and revolt” at Brazilian Royal Gala being promoted at €1 (£0.85) a kilo.

TK: Retailers can’t win. I earlier said that U.S. retailers could move out the bumper crop of domestic fruit with lower prices, but here a French grower group objects to a low price point for imported fruit.

Majority Of School Nutrition Programs Now Offer Vegetarian School Lunches

From the story In Medical News Today:

School Nutrition Association president Dr. Katie Wilson, SNS announced new data today on the widespread availability of vegetarian school lunch options. Almost two thirds of school nutrition programs now offer a vegetarian school lunch on a consistent basis, up from 22% in 2003, according to the Association's soon to be released 2009 School Nutrition Operations Report. The availability of vegetarian school lunches in a majority of districts is consistent with the overall trend in the past five years towards more nutritious school lunches emphasizing whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. The vegetarian choices also come in spite of federal school lunch reimbursements that have not kept pace with increased food and labor costs. Dr. Wilson presented the research findings at the National Conference on Childhood Obesity in Washington, DC today.

TK:  Schools can offer vegetarian fare, but will the students buy in?


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