European fruit and veg consumption in free fall: where is answer?

02/07/2012 09:04:00 AM
Tom Karst

 

TK: Ah, the elusive magic of the "public-private" partnership to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. What is the formula for success?

Meanwhile, the first news release from Fruit Logistica 2012  had some interesting references to global trends in fruit and vegetable production. From the release:

 
According to the latest figures from the AMI (agricultural market information service) in Bonn, 850 million tonnes of vegetables (excluding melons) and 725 million tonnes of fruit (including melons) were produced worldwide in 2011. Production figures for both fruit and vegetables have steadily increased over the past few years.

Apple production in the Northern Hemisphere increased in 2011, while citrus fruit production remained at the previous year's figures. Melons are the most frequently harvested fruit, followed by bananas. Together they account for a volume of 100 million tonnes. Equally important are apples, grapes and oranges with a harvest of around 70 million tonnes. 

Together, the five most important fruit varieties make up 60% of the total harvest. The spectrum is more varied for vegetables with the five leading varieties (tomatoes, onions, cabbage, cucumbers and aubergines) accounting for only about 45% of total production. Around 10% of the worldwide production of key fruit varieties is traded internationally. For fresh vegetables, this figure is only 3-4%.

TK: The AMI reports talks of a steady increase in fruit and vegetable production over the past few years, yet consumption trends in Europe and other developed markets seem to suggest otherwise. Illumination, gentlemen?

By the way, check out the "Who is going to Fruit Logistica" thread at the LinkedIn Fresh Produce Industry Discussion Group. 

Join the LinkedIn Fresh Produce Industry Discussion Group.Check out the stats from LinkedIn on the growth of the group.

Join the Fresh Produce Industry Discussion Group on Google.



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