Study: No measurable consumer health benefit for following Dirty Dozen list

06/15/2011 03:17:00 PM
Tom Karst

In summary, findings conclusively demonstrate that consumer exposures to the ten most frequently detected pesticides on EWG’s “Dirty Dozen” commodity list are at negligible levels and that the EWG methodology is insufficient to allow any meaningful rankings among commodities. We concur with EWG President Kenneth Cook who maintains that “We recommend that people eat healthy by eating more fruits and vegetables, whether conventional or organic” [1], but our findings do not indicate that substituting organic forms of the “Dirty Dozen” commodities for conventional forms will lead to any measurable consumer health benefit.


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Alex Formuzis    
Washington, DC  |  October, 24, 2011 at 01:54 PM

Leading Scientists Rely on and Back EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides By Sonya Lunder and Alex Formuzis A central theme of today’s Food Day is to work toward a more sustainable, healthy, less chemical-intensive food and farm system in the U.S. The Environmental Working Group shares this goal and thought it important for those concerned about the presence of toxic chemicals in food that nationally-recognized public health experts have endorsed EWG’s approach to creating its popular Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. Chensheng (Alex) Lu, Associate Professor of Environmental Exposure Biology at Harvard School of Public Health has advised parents and caregivers to use the Shopper’s Guide to “keep nutritional foods in their children’s diets but avoid the intake of pesticide residues in the high-pesticide-risk items.” Lu’s comments came in a study published in the federally-funded journal Environmental Health Perspectives, that found that about half of the foods most frequently eaten by children were on EWG’s Dirty Dozen list. Full post here: http://bit.ly/p312Ss

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