Survey says: confused moms should trust in Dr. Pepper?!

06/17/2013 03:43:00 PM
Tom Karst

Women can find healthy options if they want them, deflating the argument that somehow Uncle Sam or Big Brother should intervene and educate them about that. In fact, the women surveyed were twice as likely to oppose (65%) than support (31%) government regulation of salt, sugar and fat consumption.

The survey report continues:

Distrust of the media is widespread across all age, ethnic, and ideological lines. Over 4 out of 5 women agree that the media are more interested in getting ratings than accurately reporting threats to health and safety. Part of this rests in their related view—with 87% of women agreeing—that it is cheap and easy to find somebody to argue a given position. Most distressingly, an overwhelming majority (83%) of women say they have difficulty discerning between legitimate concerns that might affect their health and well-being, and scary headlines designed to attract attention.

Worse yet, the data shows that the more women pay attention to health and safety concerns (primarily delivered by the media), the more they want more warnings. Over three-quarters (78%) of women say they pay attention to negative warnings; of those women, 71% say the media sounds the alarm “not often enough” or “the right amount”. Despite the admission that they have trouble telling the difference between real and fake threats, the constant bombardment predictably leaves them with more worries. Only 36% of women say that the negative warnings they receive leaves them informed.

While the news release tended to highlight the distrust of moms’ in media, it did not highlight their skepticism of big business. For example:

“The results show women want more information but they have a widespread distrust in the media – the largest purveyors of alarmist warnings. Moreover, women have little faith in warnings provided by the federal government and activist organizations."

Yet the full survey results reveal that the only institutions that women had less trust in than those were big business and partisan politicians.

 The survey results were described in loaded language; “worse yet; ” “most distressingly”; “media- the largest purveyor of alarmist warnings”; and this (isn't it obvious?) point: "Women can find healthy options if they want them, deflating the argument that somehow Uncle Sam or Big Brother should intervene and educate them about that.”



Comments (0) Leave a comment 

Name
e-Mail (required)
Location

Comment:

characters left

Join the conversation - sign up for FREE today!
FeedWind
Feedback Form
Leads to Insight