World ending, running out of guacamole - The Packer

World ending, running out of guacamole

03/04/2014 04:21:00 PM
Fred Wilkinson

Many people associate "global warming" or "climate change" with the threat of increasingly severe weather — the polar vortex gone haywire, droughts, etc.

But it might be even worse than we feared. We may have to endure the end of the world without guacamole by our side.

According to a post on the website thinkprogress.org:

Chipotle Inc. has warned investors that extreme weather events “associated with global climate change” might eventually affect the availability of some of its ingredients. If availability is limited, prices will rise — and Chipotle isn’t sure it’s willing to pay.

It’s your choice, America. Fix the climate, or the guac gets it.

Chipotle Inc. is warning investors that extreme weather events “associated with global climate change” might eventually affect the availability of some of its ingredients. If availability is limited, prices will rise — and Chipotle isn’t sure it’s willing to pay.

“Increasing weather volatility or other long-term changes in global weather patterns, including any changes associated with global climate change, could have a significant impact on the price or availability of some of our ingredients,” the popular chain, whose Sofritas vegan tofu dish recently went national, said in its annual report released last month. “In the event of cost increases with respect to one or more of our raw ingredients we may choose to temporarily suspend serving menu items, such as guacamole or one or more of our salsas, rather than paying the increased cost for the ingredients.”

Chipotle did say that it recognizes the pain it (and its devotees) would have to go through if it decided to suspend a menu item. “Any such changes to our available menu may negatively impact our restaurant traffic and comparable restaurant sales, and could also have an adverse impact on our brand,” the filing read.

The guacamole operation at Chipotle is massive. The company uses, on average, 97,000 pounds of avocado every day to make its guac — which adds up to 35.4 million pounds of avocados every year. And while the avocado industry is fine at the moment, scientists are anticipating drier conditions due to climate change, which may have negative effects on California’s crop. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for example, predict hotter temps will cause a 40 percent drop in California‘s avocado production over the next 32 years.

Chipotle’s commitment to organic, local, and sustainable farming practices is also one of the reasons why it may be more susceptible to unexpected climate shifts. As the company notes, its food markets “are generally smaller and more concentrated than the markets for commodity food products,” meaning Chipotle buys from producers that are less able to survive bad farming conditions without raising prices. And those prices have already been raised significantly over the last year, Chipotle said.

Let the hoarding commence ...



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Doug    
Raleigh NC  |  March, 05, 2014 at 02:07 PM

This line had to come from Thinkprogress.org, not Chipotle: "It’s your choice, America. Fix the climate, or the guac gets it." Any firm that would display such ignorance to its stockholders would deserve the panic sell- off of its stock that would most certainly ensue. Where to begin? "Fix the (world) climate, America, ....". Notice anything strange there? This is the sound a socialist makes when it is trying to use other people's money, power and influence. If Chipotle really wants to put the world at large on warning that they may pull menu items, then so be it. Step up, Chipotle competitors, and tell consumers you will welcome them when Chipotle can't (or won't) source product. Tell consumers that your company is interested in food science ... not junk science. Tell your investors that your job is to make them profits, not lecture them on your pet fetish. Oh, and good luck hoarding avocados.

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