The illnesses count in the romaine outbreak has risen again. ( File Photo )

Four more deaths have been reported in connection with the E. coli outbreak linked to Arizona romaine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated the illness count to 197 and announced two deaths in Minnesota, one in Arkansas and one in New York.

A death in California had been previously reported by the CDC. Eighty-nine people have been hospitalized, with 26 developing kidney failure.

The most recent onset date is May 12, more than a week later than what was reported in the last update.

What follows is a timeline with links to related coverage from The Packer, including details about the new task force created to address outbreak concerns, feedback from the FDA and Walmart about the Produce Traceability Initiative, comparison between the current outbreak and the leafy greens outbreak of December, and more.

 

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Submitted by Kay Cavaz on Sun, 06/03/2018 - 00:00

e coli is transmitted fecal-oral route. You can't catch it from the wind, you can't catch it from birds migrating overhead that might defecate on the fields- if so, then we'd ALL have e coli. For some mysterious reason, we're not being told the source of the e coli. I have my suspicions (human source- improper handling, field workers) but every news story on this all of a sudden is pointing to obscure and ludicrous possibilities as to the source. Come on guys.