Brooks Tropicals avocado volume has been down this season due to Hurricane Irma, which damaged groves in September 2017. ( Courtesy Brooks Tropicals )

Last year's Hurricane Irma has put a dent in the supply of Slimcados marketed by Brooks Tropicals Inc. this season, but things could be worse, said Mary Ostlund, director of marketing for the Homestead, Fla.-based company.

The hurricane, which made landfall in Florida last September, caused some damage to the large, green-skin avocados, “but the damage was less than what we thought,” Ostlund said.

“We’ve been very happy with our harvest,” she said. “It’s exceeded our expectations after the storm.”

The hurricane will impact volume, she said in late July, but it was too early in the season to tell how much fruit will be lost.

“We’re seeing flowers, and where there are flowers, there is going to be fruit,” she said.

Brooks Tropicals started shipping Slimcados in late May, as usual.

“Quality is excellent,” she said. “It looks like it will be a good year, but it will be lower volume.”

She said it was hard to say for sure whether prices would rise.

“Right now, we don’t expect it to impact pricing,” she said.

The company typically ships Slimcados from Florida until early March and also sources from the Dominican Republic almost year-round.

 
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