( File photo )

The Department of Commerce’s official notice on its termination of a tomato suspension agreement with Mexico is scheduled to be published May 13.

The notice on terminating the agreement in the Federal Register also signals the start of an antidumping duty investigation into Mexico’s tomato imports into the U.S.

Steps leading to the Commerce Department’s decision to announce Feb. 6 it was dropping the agreement — triggering a required 90-day notice of its intentions — is detailed in the pre-published notice on the Federal Register.

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Comments
Submitted by Steven Nasiff on Fri, 05/10/2019 - 19:48

No way , no how will prices rise 85 percent at anytime of the year due to the 17.5 % duty.
The retail consumer will not even notice the price changes at retail. Since the average retail price is so far removed from the wholesale prices.
The importers and small to medium grower/exporters will bear the brunt of the financial and logistical problems that will be upcoming...

Submitted by Russell Costanza on Sat, 05/11/2019 - 00:57

17.5% duty will not effect the Mexican tomato exporter. Just a cost of doing business in US. Keep the existing floor price to the duty and the US grower will be equal in the US marketplace. The huge advantage the tomato exporter has till now is the slave labor wages relative to US farm workers to the mexican farm workers. US farmers are mandated $7.20 to mainly $11.00 an hour while Mexico pays $$5.50 to $16.00 for a full day’s work.
With those Mexican wages and the 17.5% duty they will continue to own the US tomato markets.

Submitted by Russell Costanza on Sat, 05/11/2019 - 00:57

17.5% duty will not effect the Mexican tomato exporter. Just a cost of doing business in US. Keep the existing floor price to the duty and the US grower will be equal in the US marketplace. The huge advantage the tomato exporter has till now is the slave labor wages relative to US farm workers to the mexican farm workers. US farmers are mandated $7.20 to mainly $11.00 an hour while Mexico pays $$5.50 to $16.00 for a full day’s work.
With those Mexican wages and the 17.5% duty they will continue to own the US tomato markets.