( Photo courtesy Western Growers )

Back in April, President Trump was quoted as saying to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue: “You can assure your farmers out there that we’re not going to allow them to be the casualties if this trade dispute escalates. We’re going to take care of our American farmers. You can tell them that directly.” 

This statement is revealing. The president is acknowledging the significant and precarious position of American agriculture in the world of international trade agreements. American farmers produce a product that the rest of the world wants, which makes our industry an easy target for retaliatory tariffs.
 
With the current escalation of trade tensions between the U.S. and its historical trading allies, agriculture once again finds itself in the crosshairs of international political posturing. 

While freer trade has benefited many American farmers, including those in the produce industry — in fact, we are now exporting more fruits and vegetables than ever before, nearly triple pre-NAFTA numbers — it is hard to ignore our perennial balance of trade deficits.

At the end of May, the initial reprieve from steel and aluminum tariffs granted to Canada, Mexico and the European Union expired. A series of retaliatory measures, including those aimed at American agricultural products, quickly followed. 

After a tense and hostile G7 summit in Canada in early June, these retaliatory tariffs are all but certain to kick in (not to mention the ongoing tit-for-tat trade measures with China).

I understand what the Trump administration is trying to accomplish. The scales of international trade are undeniably tilted in favor of our trading partners, a balance that began to tip during the late 1970s. 

While freer trade has benefited many American farmers, including those in the produce industry — in fact, we are now exporting more fruits and vegetables than ever before, nearly triple pre-NAFTA numbers — it is hard to ignore our perennial balance of trade deficits. I believe any rational supporter of free trade would agree that the U.S. could benefit from fairer deals with our trading partners. Thus, I applaud the president for getting tough on trade.

There is a limit to the burden that agriculture should be asked to bear as the collateral damage of a broader trade war.

However, there is a limit to the burden that agriculture should be asked to bear as the collateral damage of a broader trade war. The Trump administration should work to adopt measures to protect our industry from any potential fallout. In short, we expect the president to follow through on his promise to “take care of our American farmers.”

Many farmers may be unwilling to swallow a bitter pill now in order to help reset our trade relationships and benefit the American economy in the long run, so we must see some type of plan unveiled to mitigate the losses those in agriculture are already experiencing and will continue to experience so that we can gain their support. 

President Trump is embarking on an aggressive path to rebalance American trade. He knows that taking this approach will put American agriculture in harm’s way. We urge the president to fulfill his promise to mitigate any harm that befalls the industry so we will not become “the casualties” of an escalating trade war.

Tom Nassif is president and CEO of Irvine, Calif.-based Western Growers.

 
Comments
Submitted by Steve Sprinkel on Mon, 06/18/2018 - 14:52

I don't think I would be far off the mark to assume a very large majority of US farmers supported the candidacy and celebrated the election of one of the least prepared and dangerously volatile people to ever be president. I know so many had the intelligence to apprehend the disastrous potential of this administration prior to the election, but we were guided by a desire to cut back or at least slow down regulation of the farm sector. We thought we were going to get some help, but if this is help, please tell them to stop.

Now, Who will pick the peaches and grapes? Where will the next wave of entry-level farm workers come from? How in the world did we end up buying into the calamity and confusion of trade "war". How can people in any business make decisions in the midst of so much confusion, surprise, falseness and obvious corruption?

You get what you pay for. And there is probably no hope for this folly for another two years. And it's going to get worse! Now we have no power. Under Democrat leadership what was so awful? At least there was believable process you could depend on. And congress is nothing more than a pack of cowards. See how they back us all up by resigning their office. I am done and so is this deal. I was going to expand acreage in the fall, but not now.