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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

 

PEAR BUREAU NORTHWEST: Bob Catinella, East Coast marketing manager for the Pear Bureau Northwest, says the organic pear supply outlook is strong. Northwest organic pear volume expected into May or June, he says, and the group is promoting education on ripening fruit. Amazon recently reported that pears were best-sellers in holiday shipments of fresh fruit bought online, along with avocados, spinach and blueberries.
“That was a vote of confidence for us and it shows there is really a (demand) for pears,” he says.

 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

PETE’S LIVING GREENS: Brian Cook, president of Pete’s Living Greens, Carpinteria, Calif., displays the company’s variety of living lettuces. The company offers organic green butter lettuce, organic red butter lettuce, organic spring mix, and organic watercress. The firm has co-packing relationships with operators in Texas and Virginia. “Everyone is looking to do a little more organic on the retail side,” he says. One new package option from the company is called the value pack, which is a two-pack of the living lettuces. The pack offers a more attractive price for the consumer, he says.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

ROCK GARDEN FRESH HERBS: Jeff Bruff, vice president and general manager of Rock Garden Fresh Herbs, Miami, Fla., says the firm is conducting continued investigation on how to reduce plastic in packaging. In particular, he says that micro-perforated bags may be able to reduce the amount of plastic required compared with a clamshell, extend shelf life and also be biodegradable. Bruff says the company also is working with researchers at the University of Maryland to explore whether materials in plastic packaging could be used to kill harmful bio-organisms on produce such as salmonella and E. coli.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCE: Howard Nager, vice president of business development and marketing for Progressive Produce LLC, Los Angeles, Calif., says the company is expanding its supply of organic citrus and other items. The company will soon have its second season of Mexican organic asparagus starting in the Corborca region, with harvest expected to begin by late January. 
“We are looking to do a full year of organic asparagus,” Nager says, adding that Progressive Produce also has an extensive potato and onion organic program. The company has efforts in sustainable packaging development, he says. “We’re looking at some paper bags to replace some of the plastic and poly bags,” he says.
Nager says the future of organic produce is bright.
“The interest is there from consumers and retailers are trying to expand (the category) more and more right now while actually eliminating some of the conventional produce instead of duplicating items,” he says.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

TRINITY LOGISTICS: Charlotte Carroll, sales manager and team lead for Trinity Logistics, Orlando, Fla. and Maurice “Mo” Shearer, senior sales executive, Trinity Logistics, Seaford, Del., say the acquisition of Trinity Logistics by Burris Logistics last May is paying dividends for the entire business. Carroll says the combined company is a full-featured solution for transportation, warehousing and distribution needs. Burris has 13 warehouses located from Connecticut to Florida, with a couple of warehouses serving the e-commerce sector and others that serve as distribution centers for BJ’s Wholesale Club stores  “With the physical warehouses we have access to now we’re able to offer solutions to almost every problem that (customers) present,” says Shearer.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

SUNKIST GROWERS: Julie DeWolf, director of retail marketing for Sunkist Growers, Valencia, Calif., and Jeff Gaston, managing director of North American Sales for the company say the company is entering into peak supply of California organic citrus. The company offers organic navels, lemons, clementines, cara caras, blood oranges and other varieties. “We have pretty much the full line from January through March,’” Gaston says. “This is the best time of year for all organic (citrus) shippers.” Gaston says eating quality of domestic organic citrus has been phenomenal and is helping to drive demand and tonnage.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

GREAT LAKES GREENHOUSES: Chris Jones, vice president of business and operations, Great Lakes Greenhouses Inc., Leamington, Ontario, and Jeff Richardson, vice president of sales for the company, say the company offers both conventional and organic cucumbers from their 120-acre greenhouse facility devoted to cucumbers. Organic cucumbers make up about 32 acres of the total, according to the group’s website. Richardson said the GOPEX show helped bring the organic industry together.
“The biggest thing for us is just that it is great to see all the participants here building up organics and building a category and not looking at the business side of their own business,” Richardson says. “If we educate people about why organic works, we all win,” he says.
 

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