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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

 

 

OWYHEE PRODUCE: Angela Williams, sales director for onion marketer Owyhee Produce, Nyssa, Ore., and Blake Branen, director of marketing for the company, say the company is expanding its organic offerings. The company also markets seasonal asparagus and potatoes from Idaho, he says.
“We’re expanding our organic program even larger than we have in the past,” Branen says, noting new fields in California. The company recently installed a whole onion peeling facility in Nyssa, Ore.
“We’ve seen a steady increase (in organic demand) and it’s about a 20% year over year increase,” Branen says. “We are getting some pretty good growth.”

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

 

PORTMIAMI: Eric Olafson, director of global trade and business development for PortMiami, Miami, Fla, and Nimrod Simeon, trade analyst of the global trade and business development for the port say the port is working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Organic Program to try to become the first port in the U.S. that is organically certified.
“We realize that the organic market is growing exponentially and we want it to be able to be a port that could certify that (as a trader) you knew that if you were passing through it, it would have the cold chain, there would be no fumigation, there will be no (prohibited) chemicals,” Olafson says. The port also is looking at a separate set aside area for organic products at the port, to make sure that they’re not cross-contaminated with other goods.
With the hoped-for certification, sea containers will be cleaned in a different manner with organically friendly products, he says. “We just want The Whole Foods, the Publixes and the Targets of the world to know that if they come through Miami, organics are going to come through or not be tainted,” he says. The port also has been working with the group Florida Organic Growers to come up with the certification program, he says. Olafson says the port hopes to win organic certification within the year.
“Our hope is also to spread that certification to our partners or sister ports in Latin America, to make sure that the products coming in from Costa Rica from Peru, tr Colombia, the Dominican Republic, at the port of export, are using the same measures the same certification so that we’re preserving the gold chain and preserving the organic integrity.”

 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

ALWAYS FRESH FARMS: Greg Kosofsky, Always Fresh Farms, Winter Haven, Fla., and Lindsay Giddings, social media and food safety coordinator for the operation, say the firm has strong offerings of Florida organic strawberries and also is marketing a good supply of organic Mexican raspberries and blackberries. Kosofsky says the company is sourcing organic blueberries from Peru, Chile and Mexico, with Mexico’s volume to increase substantially in the spring.
“We’re letting people know that our organic supply is stronger now on bush berries, and we’re having a very nice deal out of Florida on straw

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

VILLITA: Dan Vega, sales representative for Villita, Pharr, Texas, says organic avocados account for about 6% of the company’s total avocado volume, with supply sources mainly in Mexico but also from seasonally increasing volume from Peru. “Our production has ramped up pretty nicely,” he says.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

 

ALDERMAN FARMS: Rob Sziemkiewicz,sales and director of operations, Alderman Farms, Boynton Beach, Fla., with Jim Alderman, Jr., vice president of the company and 
John Whitworth IV (Quad), Alderman Farms Sales Corp., Boynton Beach, Fla. say the firm is offering organic green cabbage and organic red cabbage for the first time.
The firm also markets organic round tomatoes, organic sweet corn and organic greens, and also markets conventionally grown herbs, including cilantro, dill, curly parsley and Italian parsley. Sziemkiewicz says the firm is offering more value-added options, including compostable produce punnets and trays.

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

CECE’S VEGGIE CO.: Jessica Kezar, Midwest regional manager for Cece’s Veggie Co., Austin, Texas, and Chris Carroll, vice president of sales for the firm, say the firm is launching two cauliflower-based products in the first quarter. Kezar says the firm’s Buffalo Cauli is expected to be distributed beginning in March, while the Cauli & Cheese will be in selected Meijer stores beginning in February. 
“There are bite-sized pieces of cauliflower and then it’s an enclosure with a cheese bag or a buffalo packet, so you can microwave it, you can put it in the oven, or boil it,” she says.

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

EXECULYTICS CONSULTING: Mike Mauti, managing partner of Execulytics Consulting, Toronto, Ontario, says the firm is offering a new edition of its Produce Almanac. 
The 464-page volume provides an overview of the total produce marketplace, he says, include price histories for commodities, comparisons of organic versus conventional products and cost projections for produce commodities during holiday periods. “It includes just about every important commodity in the produce business,” he says. More information is available at the firm’s website http://execulytics.ca/produce-almanac/.
 

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Tom Karst

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Editor Tom Karst collected these news items Jan. 11 on the show floor at the Global Organic Produce Expo.

 

 

FLAVOR TREE FRUIT CO. Maurice Cameron, global sales manager for The Flavor Tree Fruit Company LLC says 2020 will be the first year for organic volume of the firm’s Verry Cherry Plum variety. Cameron says the company is looking at sustainable packaging options for the variety, expected to be available in the month of July. About five to seven truckloads of organic Verry Cherry plums are anticipated this year, Cameron says.
“We’ll see who wants to step up and do our Verry Cherry Plums in organic either in addition conventional or just have (organic) alone,” he says. “That would be a lot of fun.” Cameron says Flavor Tree Fruit accounts for about half of California’s organic cherry crop and the firm has additional acreage in the ground this year, he says.

 

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